Cyberspace Comics market report, reviews and more

June 28, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #176 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

The DNAgents are a team of superheroes that were created through genetic engineering by the Matrix Corporation. Admittedly it doesn’t sound like an advanced concept by today’s standards but, it was ahead of the curve when it debuted in 1983. (After all, Marvel’s own genetic manipulator, Mr. Sinister, didn’t debut for another four years.) The team consisted of five heroes: Amber, Rainbow, Sham, Surge, and Tank. A frequent guest-star called Crossfire debuted in issue #4. Crossfire got his own spin-off series that lasted for 26 issues (as well as a four issue mini-series shared with Rainbow). DNAgents lasted 24 issues before it was relaunched as the New DNAgents, which was published for 17 issues.

DNAgents #4
DNAgents #4
July 1983
Will Meugniot
normalman #7
normalman #7
February 1985
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | DNAgents
On Amazon: normalman | DNAgents
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | DNAgents






June 21, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #175 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Will Eisner‘s the Spirit debuted in the Sunday pages of 1940 newspapers – the character is a masked vigilante that fights crime with the blessings of the city’s police commissioner. The Spirit has gone on to be featured in hundreds of comics as well as a feature-length film written and directed by Frank Miller.

Richie Rich #1
the Spirit
October 9, 1941
Will Eisner
normalman #6
normalman #6
December 1984
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | the Spirit
On Amazon: normalman | the Spirit
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | the Spirit






June 14, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #174 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Richard Rich, Junior debuted in Little Dot #1, published in 1953. Better known as Richie, he’s the only child of wealthy parents and is the world’s richest kid. The character has also been featured in multiple animated series as well as a feature-length film starring Macaulay Culkin as Richie. Most recently, in 2015, Netflix released a live-action Richie Rich sitcom series.

Richie Rich #1
Richie Rich #1
November 1960
Warren Kremer
normalman #5
normalman #5
October 1984
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | Richie Rich
On Amazon: normalman | Richie Rich
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | Richie Rich






June 7, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #173 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 pm

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

I couldn’t find a specific cover that normalman#3 is paying homage but, it’s very clear that this issue’s cover design is honoring those classic horror titles published by E.C. Comics in the 1950’s: Two-Fisted Tales, Shock SuspenStories, the Haunt of Fear, the Vault of Horror and Tales From the Crypt (amongst others).

Tales From the Crypt #39
Tales From the Crypt #39
December 1953
Jack Davis
normalman #3
normalman #3
June 1984
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | Tales From the Crypt
On Amazon: normalman | Tales From The Crypt
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | Tales From the Crypt






June 1, 2016

Cyberspace Comics Market Report #70 June 2016

Filed under: Cyberspace Comics Market Report — Doorman @ 12:05 pm

I started selling comics full-time in 2010 and wanted to track my progress against the online back issue markets. Here’s a look at the current comics aftermarket and my progress in achieving my goal of becoming a prominent back issue dealer.

one month change one year change five year change
Listings in eBay’s comics section 2,443,311 -19.37% -15.18% +63.70%
Cyberspace Comics listings 93,780 +1.39% +19.54% +1,201.60%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of comic listings on eBay 3.84% +25.84% +41.11% +695.13%
Number of eBay comic listings that are auctions 121,144 -18.97% +5.03% +67.92%
Percentage of eBay comic listings up for auction 4.96% +0.57% +23.95% +2.65%
Number of listings sold in eBay’s comics section (90 days) 1,099,070 -1.99%
Number of listings sold in eBay’s comics section divided by current listings 44.98% +21.54%


Total number of listings in eBay’s “comics” section

My current eBay feedback (unique): 46,254
My current eBay feedback (total): 89,406
My postive eBay feedback score: 99.9%

Here’s a look at the top five categories in my eBay store from the past 90 days.

Position Dollar Sales (eBay) # of Current Listings
First Marvel Comics Marvel Comics (19,888 listings)
Second DC Comics DC Comics (13,926 listings)
Third Graded Comics (CGC) (↑) Other Indies (8,700 listings)
Fourth Image Comics (↓) Image Comics (7,536 listings)
Fifth Other Indies (↑) Dark Horse (4,297 listings)
one month change one year change five year change
Listings on Atomic Avenue 1,219,500 +0.41% +0.32% -12.60%
Listings in the Cyberspace Comics Store on Atomic Avenue 89,808 +0.62% +18.06% +156.81%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of comic listings on AtomicAvenue 7.36% +0.19% +17.64% +193.83%
Cyberspace Comics estimated “market share” of AtomicAvenue orders 8.14% -6.33% +14.81% +80.89%
Number of unique issues on Atomic Avenue 225,516 +0.62% +9.41%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of unique issues on AtomicAvenue 39.82% +0.01% +7.90%


Total number of comics listed on Atomic Avenue
one month change one year change five year change
Number of members on ComicCollectorLive 123,285 +0.18% +23.82%
Number of items for sale on ComicCollectorLive 1,666,999 +0.32%
Number of items sold on ComicCollectorLive 2,081,654 +0.56%
Number of stores open on ComicCollectorLive 100 -0.99%
one month change one year change five year change
Number of listings in Amazon’s Entertainment Collectibles – Comic Book section 178,775 +8.21%
Number of those listings that are in the Cyberspace Comics Amazon store 89,266 +1.95%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of comic listings on Amazon 49.93% -5.79%
one month change one year change five year change
Number of listings in HipComic’s Comic Books section 160,060 -6.94%
Number of those listings that are in the Cyberspace Comics HipComic store: 92,546 +0.06%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of comic listings on HipComic 57.82% +7.53%
one month change one year change five year change
Number of listings in Bonanza’s Comics section 131,711 -1.39%

 
 

This has been an interesting snapshot of the current market. Mycomicshop has suffered a database problem that caused them to go down over the weekend. Their dropout of the ebay marketplace has thrown the numbers off considerably as the total number of listings on ebay plummetted due to their loss. I suspect they’ll be back by next month and the growth in the next month’s market report will seem very high. Ebay’s new store plans have kicked into gear now – anchor stores get 10,000 free fixed price listings and 1,000 auction listings each month. The number of auctions on ebay hasn’t been this low since July 2015. It’ll be interesting to see what effect their new store plans will have on the auction/fixed price balance.

Atomic Avenue‘s total listings are continuing their slow climb out of their most recent 5-year low brought on by a combination of increased selling fees and stricter selling metrics that removed some members (while other members left proactively). But, more importantly, their number of unique issues continues to rise consistently – and has done so since I began tracking this data.

Comic Collector Live continues to see consistent growth in their user base even though one of their member stores has closed.

Amazon‘s collectibles marketplace is too new to draw any conclusions but is still showing steady growth in its selection.

HipComic, which debuted in January 2016, just hit a major snag. The marketplace has been temporarily shut down due to a legal motion from Stanley Gibbons. The website explains that a hearing on the matter was held on May 23 and they are currently awaiting the result.

Bonanza lost a small number of listings but nothing to be concerned about.

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