Cyberspace Comics market report, reviews and more

July 26, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #179 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Cerebus the Aardvark is one of the most ambitious comics series out there. Dave Sim began the series in 1977 and published it for 300 issues, concluding in 2004. The series follows an anthropomorphic aardvark named Cerebus as he progresses through life – first as a barbarian and later into other roles (including Pope!). Whereas most comic characters don’t age – or age very little – Dave Sim allows his character to mature as the series progresses. For its time (and even still today) – that was a novel concept!

As you can see, this cover is certainly not a swipe but it does pay homage to the cover design.

Cerebus the Aardvark #33
Cerebus the Aardvark #33
December 1981
Dave Sim
normalman #10
normalman #10
August 1985
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | Cerebus
On Amazon: normalman | Cerebus
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | Cerebus






July 19, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #178 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Asterix is a famous French comic that began in 1959. It follows follows the exploits of a village of indomitable Gauls as they resist Roman occupation. It’s one of the most popular French comic series in the world.

Asterix the Gladiator
Asterix #4
1962
Albert Uderzo
normalman #9
normalman #9
June 1985
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | Asterix
On Amazon: normalman | Asterix
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | Asterix






July 5, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #177 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Famous Funnies began in 1934 and collected classic strips including Mutt & Jeff, Tailspin Tommy, Joe Palooka, and many other popular comic strips of yesteryear. One of the more notable characters featured in Famous Funnies was Buck Rogers and, as Famous Funnies was closing out its publishing history, they hired Frank Frazetta to draw Buck Rogers covers for the series from issues #209-217 (#218 was the last issue).

Famous Funnies #214
Famous Funnies #214
November 1954
Frank Frazetta
normalman #8
normalman #8
April 1985
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | Famous Funnies
On Amazon: normalman | Famous Funnies
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | Famous Funnies






June 28, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #176 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

The DNAgents are a team of superheroes that were created through genetic engineering by the Matrix Corporation. Admittedly it doesn’t sound like an advanced concept by today’s standards but, it was ahead of the curve when it debuted in 1983. (After all, Marvel’s own genetic manipulator, Mr. Sinister, didn’t debut for another four years.) The team consisted of five heroes: Amber, Rainbow, Sham, Surge, and Tank. A frequent guest-star called Crossfire debuted in issue #4. Crossfire got his own spin-off series that lasted for 26 issues (as well as a four issue mini-series shared with Rainbow). DNAgents lasted 24 issues before it was relaunched as the New DNAgents, which was published for 17 issues.

DNAgents #4
DNAgents #4
July 1983
Will Meugniot
normalman #7
normalman #7
February 1985
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | DNAgents
On Amazon: normalman | DNAgents
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | DNAgents






June 21, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #175 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Will Eisner‘s the Spirit debuted in the Sunday pages of 1940 newspapers – the character is a masked vigilante that fights crime with the blessings of the city’s police commissioner. The Spirit has gone on to be featured in hundreds of comics as well as a feature-length film written and directed by Frank Miller.

Richie Rich #1
the Spirit
October 9, 1941
Will Eisner
normalman #6
normalman #6
December 1984
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | the Spirit
On Amazon: normalman | the Spirit
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | the Spirit






June 14, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #174 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Richard Rich, Junior debuted in Little Dot #1, published in 1953. Better known as Richie, he’s the only child of wealthy parents and is the world’s richest kid. The character has also been featured in multiple animated series as well as a feature-length film starring Macaulay Culkin as Richie. Most recently, in 2015, Netflix released a live-action Richie Rich sitcom series.

Richie Rich #1
Richie Rich #1
November 1960
Warren Kremer
normalman #5
normalman #5
October 1984
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | Richie Rich
On Amazon: normalman | Richie Rich
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | Richie Rich






June 7, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #173 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 pm

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

I couldn’t find a specific cover that normalman#3 is paying homage but, it’s very clear that this issue’s cover design is honoring those classic horror titles published by E.C. Comics in the 1950’s: Two-Fisted Tales, Shock SuspenStories, the Haunt of Fear, the Vault of Horror and Tales From the Crypt (amongst others).

Tales From the Crypt #39
Tales From the Crypt #39
December 1953
Jack Davis
normalman #3
normalman #3
June 1984
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | Tales From the Crypt
On Amazon: normalman | Tales From The Crypt
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | Tales From the Crypt






May 31, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #172 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:12 pm

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

It looks as if normalman #2 is paying homage to this classic issue of Fantastic Four (guest-starring Daredevil) but the logo is actually honoring the long-standing Spider-Man logo design that debuted on the cover of Amazing Spider-Man #2 and dressed the covers of that series up through issue #394.

Fantastic Four #39
Fantastic Four #39
June 1965
Jack Kirby
normalman #2
normalman #2
April 1984
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | Fantastic Four
On Amazon: normalman | Fantastic Four
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | Fantastic Four






May 24, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #171 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 10:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Superman #146
Superman #146
July 1961
Curt Swan, Sheldon Moldoff
normalman #1
normalman #1
January 1984
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | Superman
On Amazon: normalman | Superman
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | Superman






June 16, 2015

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #170 Excalibur

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

Although the cover to Excalibur #49 credits Neal Adams (the cover artist of X-Men #56), it’s also a nod to X-Men #135. That issue is part of the Dark Phoenix Saga and the story featured in Excalibur #49 heavily involves the Phoenix Force. I think the most interesting part of this cover homage is that the Excalibur logo is destroyed here by Necrom and actually replaced in the very next issue with a new logo.

X-Men #56
X-Men #56
May 1969
Neal Adams
X-Men #135
X-Men #135
July 1980
John Byrne
Excalibur #49
Excalibur #49
April 1992
Alan Davis

On Ebay: Excalibur | X-Men
On AtomicAvenue: Excalibur | X-Men

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