Cyberspace Comics market report, reviews and more

August 9, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #181 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Archibald “Archie” Andrews debuted in Pep Comics #22 (published in December 1941). The following year, he got his own solo series which spawned dozens of spin-off titles. One of those spin-offs, Archie’s Pals ‘n’ Gals, debuted in 1952. Issue #14 of this series was the first time they utilized a multiple panel strip on the cover.

As you can see, this cover is certainly not a swipe but it does pay homage to the cover design.

Archie's Pals 'n' Gals #14
Archie’s Pals ‘n’ Gals #14
September 1960
 
normalman #12
normalman #12
December 1985
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | Archie
On Amazon: normalman | Archie
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | Archie






August 3, 2016

Cyberspace Comics Market Report #72 August 2016

Filed under: Cyberspace Comics Market Report — Doorman @ 8:00 am

I started selling comics full-time in 2010 and wanted to track my progress against the online back issue markets. Here’s a look at the current comics aftermarket and my progress in achieving my goal of becoming a prominent back issue dealer.

one month change one year change five year change
Listings in eBay’s comics section 3,220,701 +2.37% +15.07% +105.67%
Cyberspace Comics listings 91,704 -1.03% +31.07% +1,382.68%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of comic listings on eBay 2.85% -3.15% +13.89% +617.52%
Number of eBay comic listings that are auctions 175,882 +26.70% +43.27% +106.32%
Percentage of eBay comic listings up for auction 5.46% +23.83% +24.40% -16.48%
Number of listings sold in eBay’s comics section (90 days) 1,045,062 -2.16%
Number of listings sold in eBay’s comics section divided by current listings 32.45% -4.42%


Total number of listings in eBay’s “comics” section

My current eBay feedback (unique): 47,540
My current eBay feedback (total): 92,776
My postive eBay feedback score: 99.9%

Here’s a look at the top five categories in my eBay store from the past 90 days.

Position Dollar Sales (eBay) # of Current Listings
First Marvel Comics Marvel Comics (18,913 listings)
Second DC Comics DC Comics (12,785 listings)
Third Graded Comics (CGC) Other Indies (9,143 listings)
Fourth Image Comics Image Comics (7,554 listings)
Fifth Other Indies (↑) Dark Horse (4,261 listings)
one month change one year change five year change
Listings on Atomic Avenue 1,259,228 +2.00% +10.12% -11.59%
Listings in the Cyberspace Comics Store on Atomic Avenue 90,084 +0.56% +14.31% +133.51%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of comic listings on AtomicAvenue 7.15% -1.46% +3.83% +164.14%
Cyberspace Comics estimated “market share” of AtomicAvenue orders 9.78% +94.82% +52.10% +49.54%
Number of unique issues on Atomic Avenue 228,380 +0.58% +8.90%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of unique issues on AtomicAvenue 39.44% -0.01% +4.96%


Total number of comics listed on Atomic Avenue
one month change one year change five year change
Number of members on ComicCollectorLive 127,443 +1.93% +25.21%
Number of items for sale on ComicCollectorLive 1,673,873 +0.34%
Number of items sold on ComicCollectorLive 2,106,067 +0.46%
Number of stores open on ComicCollectorLive 97 -3.00%
one month change one year change five year change
Number of listings in Amazon’s Entertainment Collectibles – Comic Book section 202,379 +10.81% +235.14%
Number of those listings that are in the Cyberspace Comics Amazon store 90,078 +1.96% +253.61%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of comic listings on Amazon 44.51% -8.00% +5.52%
one month change one year change five year change
Number of listings in HipComic’s Comic Books section 156,249 -11.46%
Number of those listings that are in the Cyberspace Comics HipComic store: 91,343 -0.23%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of comic listings on HipComic 58.46% +12.68%
one month change one year change five year change
Number of listings in Bonanza’s Comics section 139,901 +7.54%

 
 

eBay’s comics marketplace has reached the second highest selection in terms of listings offered since I began tracking this data.

Atomic Avenue‘s total listings are continuing their climb. This month, their one year change is over a 10% gain.

Comic Collector Live continues to see consistent growth in their user base although their number of stores continues to slowly drop.

I’ve been tracking Amazon‘s collectibles marketplace for a year now. It’s first year’s growth in terms of number of listings is over 225% and growing quickly.

HipComic is back in action! However, they took a more than 20% drop in their number of listings. Let’s hope that temporary shutdown doesn’t affect their validity as a marketplace.

Bonanza put on some strong gains this month.

August 2, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #180 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Howard Chaykin launched American Flagg in 1983. This creator-owned series that follows protagonist, Reuben Flagg, is a mix of science fiction and political satire.

As you can see, this cover is certainly not a swipe but it does pay homage to the cover design.

American Flagg #1
American Flagg #1
October 1983
Howard Chaykin
normalman #11
normalman #11
October 1985
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | American Flagg
On Amazon: normalman | American Flagg
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | American Flagg






July 26, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #179 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Cerebus the Aardvark is one of the most ambitious comics series out there. Dave Sim began the series in 1977 and published it for 300 issues, concluding in 2004. The series follows an anthropomorphic aardvark named Cerebus as he progresses through life – first as a barbarian and later into other roles (including Pope!). Whereas most comic characters don’t age – or age very little – Dave Sim allows his character to mature as the series progresses. For its time (and even still today) – that was a novel concept!

As you can see, this cover is certainly not a swipe but it does pay homage to the cover design.

Cerebus the Aardvark #33
Cerebus the Aardvark #33
December 1981
Dave Sim
normalman #10
normalman #10
August 1985
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | Cerebus
On Amazon: normalman | Cerebus
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | Cerebus






July 19, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #178 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Asterix is a famous French comic that began in 1959. It follows follows the exploits of a village of indomitable Gauls as they resist Roman occupation. It’s one of the most popular French comic series in the world.

Asterix the Gladiator
Asterix #4
1962
Albert Uderzo
normalman #9
normalman #9
June 1985
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | Asterix
On Amazon: normalman | Asterix
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | Asterix






July 6, 2016

Cyberspace Comics Market Report #71 July 2016

Filed under: Cyberspace Comics Market Report — Doorman @ 10:25 am

I started selling comics full-time in 2010 and wanted to track my progress against the online back issue markets. Here’s a look at the current comics aftermarket and my progress in achieving my goal of becoming a prominent back issue dealer.

one month change one year change five year change
Listings in eBay’s comics section 3,146,256 +28.77% +10.75% +101.86%
Cyberspace Comics listings 92,657 -1.20% +22.54% +1,308.38%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of comic listings on eBay 2.94% +23.31% +10.71% +597.68%
Number of eBay comic listings that are auctions 138,821 +14.59% +40.23% +66.98%
Percentage of eBay comic listings up for auction 4.41% -11.04% +26.79% -17.22%
Number of listings sold in eBay’s comics section (90 days) 1,068,179 -2.81%
Number of listings sold in eBay’s comics section divided by current listings 33.95% -24.52%


Total number of listings in eBay’s “comics” section

My current eBay feedback (unique): 47,010
My current eBay feedback (total): 91,409
My postive eBay feedback score: 99.9%

Here’s a look at the top five categories in my eBay store from the past 90 days.

Position Dollar Sales (eBay) # of Current Listings
First Marvel Comics Marvel Comics (19,660 listings)
Second DC Comics DC Comics (13,536 listings)
Third Graded Comics (CGC) Other Indies (8,760 listings)
Fourth Image Comics Image Comics (7,421 listings)
Fifth Wholesale (↑) Dark Horse (4,250 listings)
one month change one year change five year change
Listings on Atomic Avenue 1,234,591 +1.24% -1.69% -12.71%
Listings in the Cyberspace Comics Store on Atomic Avenue 89,580 -0.25% +16.18% +131.68%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of comic listings on AtomicAvenue 7.26% -1.42% +18.17% +165.41%
Cyberspace Comics estimated “market share” of AtomicAvenue orders 5.02% -38.33% -30.66% -37.87%
Number of unique issues on Atomic Avenue 227,063 +0.69% +9.23%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of unique issues on AtomicAvenue 39.45% -0.93% +6.37%


Total number of comics listed on Atomic Avenue
one month change one year change five year change
Number of members on ComicCollectorLive 125,034 +1.42% +24.47%
Number of items for sale on ComicCollectorLive 1,668,162 +0.07%
Number of items sold on ComicCollectorLive 2,096,488 +0.71%
Number of stores open on ComicCollectorLive 100 +0.00%
one month change one year change five year change
Number of listings in Amazon’s Entertainment Collectibles – Comic Book section 182,629 +2.16%
Number of those listings that are in the Cyberspace Comics Amazon store 88,347 -1.03%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of comic listings on Amazon 48.38% -3.11%
one month change one year change five year change
Number of listings in HipComic’s Comic Books section 176,470 +10.25%
Number of those listings that are in the Cyberspace Comics HipComic store: 91,553 -1.07%
Cyberspace Comics “market share” of comic listings on HipComic 51.88% -10.27%
one month change one year change five year change
Number of listings in Bonanza’s Comics section 130,092 -1.23%

 
 

Now that Mycomicshop has returned to the eBay marketplace, the numbers have returned to their “normal” state – this accounts for the large upticks in monthly gains shown above.

Atomic Avenue‘s total listings are continuing their slow climb out of their most recent 5-year low brought on by a combination of increased selling fees and stricter selling metrics that removed some members (while other members left proactively). But, more importantly, their number of unique issues continues to rise consistently – and has done so since I began tracking this data.

Comic Collector Live continues to see consistent growth in their user base.

Amazon‘s collectibles marketplace is too new to draw any conclusions but is still showing steady growth in its selection.

HipComic, which debuted in January 2016, hit a major last month. The marketplace has been temporarily shut down due to a legal motion from Stanley Gibbons. The website explains that a hearing on the matter was held on May 23 and they are currently awaiting the result. Despite the hiatus, the number of listings grew by an impressive 10% over last month.

Bonanza lost a small number of listings but nothing to be concerned about.

July 5, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #177 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Famous Funnies began in 1934 and collected classic strips including Mutt & Jeff, Tailspin Tommy, Joe Palooka, and many other popular comic strips of yesteryear. One of the more notable characters featured in Famous Funnies was Buck Rogers and, as Famous Funnies was closing out its publishing history, they hired Frank Frazetta to draw Buck Rogers covers for the series from issues #209-217 (#218 was the last issue).

Famous Funnies #214
Famous Funnies #214
November 1954
Frank Frazetta
normalman #8
normalman #8
April 1985
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | Famous Funnies
On Amazon: normalman | Famous Funnies
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | Famous Funnies






June 28, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #176 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

The DNAgents are a team of superheroes that were created through genetic engineering by the Matrix Corporation. Admittedly it doesn’t sound like an advanced concept by today’s standards but, it was ahead of the curve when it debuted in 1983. (After all, Marvel’s own genetic manipulator, Mr. Sinister, didn’t debut for another four years.) The team consisted of five heroes: Amber, Rainbow, Sham, Surge, and Tank. A frequent guest-star called Crossfire debuted in issue #4. Crossfire got his own spin-off series that lasted for 26 issues (as well as a four issue mini-series shared with Rainbow). DNAgents lasted 24 issues before it was relaunched as the New DNAgents, which was published for 17 issues.

DNAgents #4
DNAgents #4
July 1983
Will Meugniot
normalman #7
normalman #7
February 1985
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | DNAgents
On Amazon: normalman | DNAgents
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | DNAgents






June 21, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #175 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Will Eisner‘s the Spirit debuted in the Sunday pages of 1940 newspapers – the character is a masked vigilante that fights crime with the blessings of the city’s police commissioner. The Spirit has gone on to be featured in hundreds of comics as well as a feature-length film written and directed by Frank Miller.

Richie Rich #1
the Spirit
October 9, 1941
Will Eisner
normalman #6
normalman #6
December 1984
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | the Spirit
On Amazon: normalman | the Spirit
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | the Spirit






June 14, 2016

Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed #174 normalman

Filed under: Swiped: Comic Book Cover Swipes Exposed! — Doorman @ 8:00 am

After looking at hundreds of comic book covers, it becomes quickly apparent that not every cover is 100% original. Whether done intentionally or even underhandedly, there’s something about uncovering these “swipes” that adds a new element of fun to reading and collecting comics.

In a twist on the Superman mythos, the title character in Jim Valentino’s normalman (stylized in all lower-case letters) is shipped off into space by his father when he concludes that the planet they inhabit will explode. The child arrives on a planet inhabited completely by super-powered beings – they dub him normalman, because he’s the only one there without powers.

The character debuted in Cerebus the Aardvark #56 and was soon given his own ongoing series. That title served as a vehicle for creator, Jim Valentino, to spoof and parody other comics, a perfect opportunity (if ever there was one) to introduce cover swipes that parody the source material.

Richard Rich, Junior debuted in Little Dot #1, published in 1953. Better known as Richie, he’s the only child of wealthy parents and is the world’s richest kid. The character has also been featured in multiple animated series as well as a feature-length film starring Macaulay Culkin as Richie. Most recently, in 2015, Netflix released a live-action Richie Rich sitcom series.

Richie Rich #1
Richie Rich #1
November 1960
Warren Kremer
normalman #5
normalman #5
October 1984
Jim Valentino

On Ebay: normalman | Richie Rich
On Amazon: normalman | Richie Rich
On AtomicAvenue: normalman | Richie Rich






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